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Grid study will test administration’s grasp ...

“Facts,” said President John Adams, “are stubborn things.” Wishing otherwise doesn’t change them. That adage may be tested at the Department of Energy, as Secretary Rick Perry grapples with debates inside his department that could shape the Trump administration’s impact on the rapidly changing electricity system. Perry will appear at a press conference in Washington today with the director...

Large Solar Farms Proposed In Three Ohio Counties

A couple of large wind farms have cropped up in Ohio over the past couple of years, but the state still hasn’t seen a big development with solar power. That could change very soon with not one but three big solar farms in the works. The three plans, which have been submitted for approval by state regulators, would generate between 125-150 megawatts each. To get an idea of just how big this is, the largest solar generator...

Colorado signs on to U.S. Climate Alliance, joinin...

Gov. Hickenlooper orders statewide greenhouse gas emissions cut Colorado on Tuesday joined the growing number of states and cities committed to meeting or exceeding greenhouse gas reduction targets set in the international Paris climate agreement that President Donald Trump rejects. Gov. John Hickenlooper issued an executive order compelling a greenhouse gas emissions cut before 2025 by at least 26 percent below 2005 levels....

U.S. Shale Producers Are Drilling Themselves into ...

LONDON, June 30 (Reuters) – U.S. shale firms are drilling themselves into a deep hole despite warnings from industry leaders about the risk of flooding the market with too much crude. Drilling and production are rising. Prices are declining. Companies are barely breaking even or losing money. Costs are starting to rise. And share prices are sliding. Current oil prices are not sustainable according to Harold Hamm, the...

Natural gas building boom fuels climate worries, e...

They landed, one after another, in 2015: plans for nearly a dozen interstate pipelines to move natural gas beneath rivers, mountains and people’s yards. Like spokes on a wheel, they’d spread from Appalachia to markets in every direction. Together these new and expanded pipelines — comprising 2,500 miles of steel in all — would double the amount of gas that could flow out of Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. The cheap...

State criticized for shifting millions from oil-an...

With three legislators objecting to the “raid,” a state board on Monday approved appropriating $15 million from an oil-and-gas fund designated by law to protect Ohioans and the environment, to be used to pay a settlement of an unrelated lawsuit. The Controlling Board voted 4-3 to remove the money from the fund, which is used in part to seal “orphan” natural-gas and oil wells, to fund a settlement with landowners near Grand...

Shrinking greenhouse gas emissions is all about ec...

WEC Energy Group Inc. president and CEO Allen Leverett enjoys reading biographies of America’s “conservationist president” Theodore Roosevelt, but it’s not environmentalism that’s igniting Leverett’s drive to reduce his company’s greenhouse gas emissions. For Leverett, the even-keeled CEO of Wisconsin’s largest electric utility, it’s all about economics — not ecology. And definitely not politics. Specifically, what Leverett...

Editorial: ‘Keystone XL Pipeline Runs Afoul of the...

Editorial Board of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: The company that is building the controversial Keystone XL pipeline no doubt wishes Energy Secretary Rick Perry had been right last week when he explained the law of supply and demand. At a coal-fired power plant in West Virginia on Thursday, Perry dismissed worries about the future of coal by saying, “Here’s a little economics lesson: supply and demand. You put the supply out...

Solar power output up 10 percent in new panels, CW...

Cleveland, Ohio — Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) has been awarded a $1.47 million federal grant to determine the durability of a new, more powerful solar panel design already commercially available. The hot new design — known in the industry as “Passivated Emitter Rear Cell,” or PERC — typically boosts the output of an off-the-shelf solar panel by 10 percent. And manufacturers can make...

Ohio EPA: Rover Pipeline refusing to comply

MANSFIELD – The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency has asked the company installing the Rover Pipeline to be respectful of the environment, but it has ignored such requests. The state of Ohio intends to change that. During a Monday conference call with media, Craig Butler, the director of the Ohio EPA, said the Ohio EPA has issued a unilateral order to Energy Transfer Partners, the parent company of Rover Pipeline,...

Trump’s Paris Agreement withdrawal: What it means ...

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published shortly before President Trump’s announcement on the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate accord, anticipating that outcome. It has since been updated to reflect the decision. Today, President Donald Trump announced that he will withdraw the United States from the landmark Paris Agreement on climate change. It was adopted in 2015 by 195 nations, with 147...

Just 100 companies responsible for 71% of greenhou...

The most polluting investor-owned companies on the list are ExxonMobil, Shell, BP and Chevron Just 100 companies are responsible for more than 70 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions over the last three decades, new research has revealed. The Carbon Majors Report, from the Carbon Disclosure Project, found that just 25 of those companies are the source of more than half of greenhouse gas emissions since 1988 – the year...

AEP Appalachian subsidiary plans to buy 175-megawa...

An American Electric Power Company Inc. subsidiary wants to buy an Ohio wind farm. Appalachian Power plans to buy the Hardin Wind Farm, a 175-megawatt, 70-turbine project being developed by Chicago-based Invenergy LLC in Hardin County, in northwestern Ohio. Enlarge AEP’s Appalachian Power subsidiary plans to buy a wind farm in northwestern Ohio. The company has 1 million customers in West Virginia, Virginia and...

Ohio decision could put more ratepayers on the hoo...

Critics say an Ohio court decision last week underscores the urgency of a pending bill to address unfairness under current law, while opening the door to more efforts by utilities to shift the economic burdens for past pollution to today’s customers. Under the Supreme Court of Ohio’s June 29 court decision, Cincinnati-area utility customers must pay $55.5 million to Duke Energy for cleanup of contamination from plants that...

Hot Spots – Climate change will not affect e...

restricted water supplies It could have been the edge of the Sahara Desert or even Death Valley, but it was the remains of a large orchard in the hills above the city of Murcia in southern Spain last year. The soil had broken down into fine white, lifeless sand, and a landscape of rock and dying orange and lemon trees stretched into the distance. A long drought, the second in a few years, had devastated the harvest after...

Utilities fighting against rooftop solar are only ...

Batteries are going to make rooftop solar invulnerable Several of the big trends in clean electricity depend, in one way or another, on batteries. How fast batteries get better and cheaper will help determine how fast renewable energy grows, how fast fossil fuel power plants get shut down, and how fast the vehicle fleet electrifies.  The consulting firm McKinsey & Company recently released an analysis noting that...

Rooftop Solar Dims Under Pressure From Utility Lob...

Over the past six years, rooftop solar panel installations have seen explosive growth — as much as 900 percent by one estimate. That growth has come to a shuddering stop this year, with a projected decline in new installations of 2 percent, according to projections from Bloomberg New Energy Finance. A number of factors are driving the reversal, from saturation in markets like California to financial woes at several top solar...

100% Renewables Plan Has ‘Significant Shortcomings...

A new study calls out the assumptions in a leading renewable energy roadmap developed by Mark Jacobson. It’s a common claim from advocates: We know we can create a 100 percent renewable grid, because Stanford Professor Mark Jacobson said we can. Jacobson’s peer-reviewed studies assert that it is possible to convert all energy use in the U.S. to wind, water and solar — while maintaining grid reliability,...

No, Cities Are Not Actually Leading on Climate. En...

Sam Brooks, a former director for the D.C. government’s energy division, examines the “cities are leading on climate” myth. The idea that cities are leading on climate change is applauded over and over and over. There’s just one problem. It’s not actually happening. Retrofit programs for buildings and homes aren’t delivering results. Power distribution remains rooted in century-old thinking and technology. And...

Mind the Storage Gap: How Much Flexibility Do We N...

The Climate Policy Initiative quantifies the flexibility needs and costs in 80- to 100-percent-renewables scenarios. Imagine for a moment that we have built enough wind and solar power plants to supply 100 percent of the electricity a region like California or Germany consumes in a year. Sure, the wind and sun aren’t always available, so this system would need flexible resources to fill in the gaps. But with continuing rapid...