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GM commits to ‘all-electric future’ as it adds 2 more pure EVs due by 2023

GM commits to ‘all-electric future’ as it adds 2 more pure EVs due by 2023

This photo provided by General Motors Co. shows a Chevrolet Bolt, surrounded by nine electric and fuel cell vehicles covered by tarps. On Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, GM announced the company will produce two new electric vehicles on the Bolt underpinnings in the next 18 months and 20 electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2023. (Courtesy of General Motors Co. via AP)

This photo provided by General Motors Co. shows a Chevrolet Bolt, surrounded by nine electric and fuel cell vehicles covered by tarps. On Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, GM announced the company will produce two new electric vehicles on the Bolt underpinnings in the next 18 months and 20 electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles by 2023. (Courtesy of General Motors Co. via AP)(AP)
General Motors presented its strategic vision on how it plans to move the world toward a future of “zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion” on Monday, Oct. 2.

The Detroit-based automaker also confirmed it will introduce two new all-electric vehicles in the next 18 months to add to its some 20 all-electric vehicles due out by 2023. GM also made a point to say it would further support the production of hydrogen fuel cells for commercial or military use in the next three years.

France aims to outlaw sale of all diesel, petrol vehicles by 2040

This tough task to accomplish in 20 years is being announced as part of the country’s efforts to meet the targets under the Paris climate accord.

“General Motors believes in an all-electric future,” Mark Reuss, GM’s executive vice president of product development, purchasing and supply chain, said in a news release.

“Although that future won’t happen overnight, GM is committed to driving increased usage and acceptance of electric vehicles through no-compromise solutions that meet our customers’ needs.”

The Associated Press reports that the two new unspecified all-electric vehicles are likely to be an SUV or a sports car to compete with Tesla’s more affordable Model 3. GM says that the new all-electric vehicles, the first of “at least” 20 new all-electric vehicles to hit the market, will have influences from its Chevrolet Bolt EV.

Tesla to deliver first 30 Model 3s to customers Friday night

Tesla will deliver the first 30 of its new Model 3s to customers at a party for staff and invited guests Friday night, July 28. Reports say the first 30 of the Model 3 electric cars will go to Tesla and SpaceX staff members, who are “more tolerant” of early bugs.

Michelle Krebs, an executive analyst for Autotrader, said in an emailed statement this “General Motors has drawn a line in the sand: Its future will be all electric.”

GM’s 2017 Chevy Bolt EV starts at around $37,000 (eligible for federal tax credit) battery-only range of 238 miles while hitting a top speed of 93 mph and making 200 horsepower. The 2017 Bolt EV, GM’s first all-electric car, was named both the North American and Motor Trend car of the year.

Volvo says every car it makes from 2019 will have an electric motor

Volvo will become the first major automaker to skip traditional engines and produce electric motors for all of its models starting in 2019.

“In the past, it was all hush-hush until the big reveal at an auto show,” Rebecca Lindland, an executive analyst at Kelley Blue Book, said in an emailed statement. “Now, there’s increasing transparency regarding upcoming product and announcements are done throughout the calendar, in part to keep consumers engaged but also to stay on top of the latest trends and news cycles.

“This latest event by GM regarding ‘all electric’ is further proof of a rapidly changing industry, whether the consumers want it or not.”

Source: mlive Michigan

By Benjamin Raven

LINK: http://www.mlive.com/auto/index.ssf/2017/10/gm_emissions-free_by_2023.html

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from EcoWatch:

After the GM announcement, a Ford executive told Automotive News it was also on track to roll out 13 new EV models over the next five years. Many experts agree that a wave of new regulations worldwide, including strong commitments from the Chinese government to roll out electric vehicles, are doing more to influence the direction of U.S. automakers than consumer demand.

“General Motors believes in an all-electric future,” Mark L. Reuss, G.M.’s global product chief, told the New York Times. “Although that future won’t happen overnight, G.M. is committed to driving increased usage and acceptance of electric vehicles.”

As reported by the New York Times:

“The automakers believe they can solve the problem of achieving—as G.M.’s chief executive, Mary T. Barra, has begun stressing—a world with “zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion.”

It is a stunning statement from a company that, together with Ford, sells more large pickup trucks and full-size sport utility vehicles than the rest of the global industry combined—and from an industry that grudgingly got into building electric vehicles in the face of stricter fuel emissions standards.”

For a deeper dive:

Both companies: New York Times, Washington Post. GM: CNBC, USA Today, The Verge, Ars Technica, LA Times. Ford: Automotive News, Reuters, Quartz, Engadget, Forbes. China: WSJ

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

LINK: https://www.ecowatch.com/electric-vehicles-gm-ford-2492373706.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=0709d49eac-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-0709d49eac-86118937

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more: 

This stunning statement from General Motors will keep Big Oil up at night

GM, Ford, and China strongly embrace electric cars, signaling trouble for Big Oil.

GM CEO Mary Barra and an autonomous Chevrolet Bolt electric car, 2-15-16. CREDIT: AP/Paul Sancya.

GM CEO Mary Barra and an autonomous Chevrolet Bolt electric car, 2-15-16. CREDIT: AP/Paul Sancya.

“General Motors believes in an all-electric future,” Mark Reuss, GM’s head of global product development, announced in a corporate press release Monday.

These are remarkable words for a company that has become a global behemoth over the past century by making and selling tens of millions of cars, SUVs, and light trucks that run on liquid fossil fuels. When you add in plans from huge, fast-growing markets like China and India to quickly shift to EVs and end the sale of petrol cars, it’s clear that upending the car market will also upend the oil market.

Reuss said GM would accelerate the transition to electric vehicles (EVs), with two new EV models coming out in 2018, and “at least” another 18 by 2023. On the same day, Ford Motor Co. announced it would release 13 new EV models in the next five years.

The electric vehicle revolution has been supercharged by plummeting lithium-ion prices, which are half of what they were in 2014. Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) forecasts EVs will be as cheap as gasoline cars by 2025 and keep dropping in price until EVs overtake them in yearly sales, by which time EVs will be displacing 8 million barrels of oil a day — more than Saudi Arabia exports today.

But BNEF pointed out last year that the 2014 oil price collapse was triggered by a global glut of just 2 million barrels a day. So they’ve already told investors to expect the big crash in oil as soon as 2023.

Indeed, what makes the GM and Ford announcements so “stunning,” as the New York Times explains, is that the two companies together sell “more large pickup trucks and full-size sport utility vehicles than the rest of the global industry combined.” Ford already plans to offer a crossover EV with a 300-mile range by 2020.

So the gas guzzlers are going to be replaced by electricity sippers, super-efficient vehicles that have one-quarter the annual fuel bill, even running on carbon-free renewable energy. In fact, EVs might have a zero fuel bill if utilities keep making deals with car companies and car owners to sell power back to the grid when needed.

At least in Europe, the major oil companies can see the writing on the wall. The CEO of Shell Oil said this summer that oil demand might peak within 15 years and that his next car would be electric.

But in the U.S., tragically, Big Oil has a key ally in the Trump administration, which is doing everything possible to promote oil use, boost carbon pollution, and slow down the clean energy revolution. This week’s moves by GM and Ford offer some hope, however, that U.S. workers won’t be completely left behind as rest of the world goes electric.

LINK: https://thinkprogress.org/gm-future-is-all-electric-f23130e8f9a1/

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