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How energy efficiency is paying off in Wisconsin

How energy efficiency is paying off in Wisconsin

Every dollar spent by a utility-funded program results in more than $5 in benefits.

 

In Wisconsin, it pays to get rid of your old, energy-wasting refrigerator.

Beard: “We pay you money for your old refrigerator, and more importantly for some people is we’ll come to your house and pick it up!”

John Beard is with Focus on Energy. For more than 15 years, the utility-funded program has helped customers become more energy efficient.

For example, the program helps pay for energy audits and distributes free LED light bulbs and low-flow shower heads. It also offers incentives to upgrade heating and cooling equipment.

Beard: “Those financial incentives are a way to offset the initial cost of making an investment in energy efficiency.”

Beard says that in 2017, participating customers saved enough energy overall to power roughly 70,000 homes.

The program demonstrates that energy efficiency is a cost-effective way to reduce carbon pollution and save people money. Beard says each dollar invested in the program generates more than five dollars in benefits.

Beard: “That’s economic benefits, that’s reduced fuel costs, and reduced pollution, so we think we’re a growing economic engine for the state, and that cost-benefit ratio is pretty hard to argue with.”

Reporting credit: Daisy Simmons/ChavoBart Digital Media.
Photo credit: USAF / Aaron J. Jenne

Electricity meter

 

Source:  Yale Climate Connection Image result for yale climate connection logo pix

BY:

LINK:  https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2019/05/how-energy-efficiency-is-paying-off-in-wisconsin

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How a Tennessee family dramatically reduced its carbon emissions

Before making changes, they actually were polluting more than average Americans.

Hrivnak home
The Hrivnak’s installed solar panels that produce enough energy to power their house and cars. (Photo: Courtesy of David Hrivnak)

David Hrivnak, a retired engineer from Kingsport, Tennessee, has been worried about climate change for a long time. So when he sat down to calculate the carbon emissions from his family’s home and car, he was dismayed by what he learned.

Hrivnak: “We were worse than average, I was actually part of the problem rather than part of the solution. And for us, most of that was through our vehicles – driving scouts to and from camp, running the kids to and from school, and taking family trips.”

‘I was actually part of the problem rather than part of the solution. And for us, most of that was through our vehicles.’ Click To TweetHrivnak was determined to change that. So now, he and his wife drive electric vehicles. They also installed solar panels that produce enough energy to power their house and cars.

These investments can be costly in the short-term. But he says they will pay off over time. EV’s are cheaper to maintain.

Hrivnak: “There’s no transmissions, there’s no oil changes, there’s no tune-ups, there’s no belts to replace.”

And charging the cars costs less than paying for gas. On a recent drive home from Mississippi …

Hrivnak: “We did that 650 miles easily in one day and our total cost to drive home was $16.20.”

So he says in the long-run, he’s saving money and reducing his carbon emissions.

Reporting credit: Sarah Kennedy/ChavoBart Digital Media.

LINK:  read:https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2019/04/tennessee-family-dramatically-cuts-carbon-emissions/

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