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Coke and Pepsi Are The World’s Top Consumer Plastic Polluters. Again

Coke and Pepsi Are The World’s Top Consumer Plastic Polluters. Again
Coca-Cola was found to be the most polluted brand in the world for the second year in a row, according to a global audit of collected plastic trash conducted by the Break Free From Plastic global movement, as The Intercept reported.

While Nestle, Pepsi and snack-maker Mondelez followed Coca-Cola, the Atlanta-based beverage giant was responsible for more plastic litter than the other three combined, according to the report called BRANDED Volume II: Identifying the World’s Top Corporate Plastic Polluters.

The plastic was counted during “brand audits” where Break Free From Plastic counted plastic litter collected in 484 cleanups in more than 50 countries on six continents in September, as Vice reported.

To undertake such a large project, Break Free From Plastic enlisted more than 72,000 volunteers who scoured beaches, waterways and streets. The volunteers collected bottles, cups, wrappers, bags and scraps during World Clean Up Day on Sept. 21. After sorting through the collected debris, the researchers identified 50 different types of waste traced back to nearly 8,000 different brands. Coke was the most counted product at 11,372 identifiable pieces of plastic litter in 37 countries, according to the report, as The Intercept reported.

The numbers for Coke, PepsiCo, Mondelez International and Unilever were probably low, since more than half of the plastic had eroded to the point where it was impossible to identify which brand it belonged to. The volunteers collected 476,423 pieces of plastic waste, but only 43 percent were marked with a clear consumer brand, according to the report.

Coke was the top source of branded plastic collected in Africa and Europe. It was the second largest in Asia and South America, but fifth in North America. In North America, the most collected plastic litter was produced by Nestle, followed by the Solo Cup Company, and Starbucks, according to the The Intercept.

“This report provides more evidence that corporations urgently need to do more to address the plastic pollution crisis they’ve created,” said Von Hernandez, global coordinator of the Break Free From Plastic movement. “Their continued reliance on single-use plastic packaging translates to pumping more throwaway plastic into the environment. Recycling is not going to solve this problem.”

Recent investigations have found that only 9 percent of all plastic is recycled. Most ends up in landfills, burned in incinerators or it is dumped in the ocean. The collected litter has spurred Break Free From Plastic to urge companies to eliminate their production of single-use plastic packaging and to instead find innovative solutions, according to Vice.

The report suggested that cities adapt a zero-waste lifestyle. It also suggested brands set up a delivery system for refills, that people use traditional packaging like banana leaves, and that consumers to use their own reusable materials, as Vice reported.

Coca-Cola has recently introduced Dasani water in aluminum cans and a plastic bottle made of marine waste. Both Coca-Cola and PepsiCo have pledged to package their products in fully recyclable, reusable or compostable containers by 2025. However, Break Free From Plastic and Greenpeace balk at the beverage manufacturers actions.

“Recent commitments by corporations like Coca-Cola, Nestlé, and PepsiCo to address the crisis unfortunately continue to rely on false solutions like replacing plastic with paper or bioplastics and relying more heavily on a broken global recycling system,” said Abigail Aguilar, Greenpeace Southeast Asia plastic campaign coordinator, in a statement. “These strategies largely protect the outdated throwaway business model that caused the plastic pollution crisis, and will do nothing to prevent these brands from being named the top polluters again in the future.”

Coca-Cola responded to questions from The Intercept with an emailed statement: “Any time our packaging ends up in our oceans — or anywhere that it doesn’t belong — is unacceptable to us. In partnership with others, we are working to address this critical global issue, both to help turn off the tap in terms of plastic waste entering our oceans and to help clean up the existing pollution.”

This photo taken on May 19, 2018 shows plastic waste on a garbage-filled beach on the Freedom island critical habitat and ecotourism area near Manila in the Philippines. NOEL CELIS / AFP / Getty Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: EcoWatch

www.ecowatch.com

By:  Jordan Davidson Oct. 24, 2019 12:21PM EST

LINK: https://www.ecowatch.com/coke-pepsi-plastic-polluters-2641090767.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=0ae3cc703d-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-0ae3cc703d-8611893

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Mid Ohio Provides Plastics found on the Beaches and in the Wildlife

Ken Apacki, Granville
3 November 2019

We spent the week in Florida and on one day we visited the University of Florida’s Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience. Here they rescue turtles and showed us the plastics ingested by turtles. Little pieces of UV degrades plastic straws and other plastic flotsam and jetsam that are eaten by the turtles.

Image result for whitney laboratory for marine bioscience

I have thought that most of the trash in the ocean came from sources near the ocean until today. On our drive back to Central Ohio we drove along the Ohio River. At Gallipolis Lock and Dam we stopped to stretch and look at the dam. The dam gates were retaining flotsam that contained a lot of plastics. Here are the pictures:

Trash on the Ohio River at the Gallipolis Lock & Dam
Nov 3, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic in the trash on the Ohio River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastic in the trach on the Ohio River.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So it is easy to see that the plastic discarded in Licking County can make its way to the Licking River, Muskingum River, Ohio River, Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico and maybe into the Atlantic Ocean.

On its way, the sun makes it brittle and it breaks into small pieces that are eaten by young and mature wildlife – turtles, fish and birds.  Many suffer and are killed by the plastics in their stomachs and intestines.

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Barrier to Stop Plastic Waste From Reaching the Sea Launches in Amsterdam

www.ecowatch.com

The scourge of plastic waste that washes up on once-pristine beaches and finds its way into the middle of the ocean often starts on land, is dumped in rivers and canals, and gets carried out to sea. At the current rate, marine plastic is predicted to outweigh all the fish in the seas by 2050, according to Silicon Canals.

Now, a Dutch start-up has launched a barrier device to remove plastic from canals and rivers while allowing fish to swim right through, as The Guardian reported.

The Great Bubble Barrier, an innovative start-up, teamed up with the Amsterdam municipal government and the regional water board to launch their device last week in Amsterdam’s Westerdok Canal, at the tip of city’s historic canal belt. The canal is an ideal starting point since it empties into the IJ river, which feeds the North Sea Canal and then the North Sea, as Silicon Canals reported.

“This is an important milestone,” said Francis Zoet, co-founder of The Great Bubble Barrier start-up, as DutchNews reported. “This is the first project that is going to stop plastic from ending up in the sea.”

The device consists of a pipe nearly 200 feet long that is punctured with holes and laid at the bottom of the canal. It sits at the canal bed on a diagonal line. Compressed air is pumped into the pipe, which then forms bubbles as it leaves. Since it is positioned diagonally, pieces of plastic are pushed toward the side of the canal by the bubbles. Then a floating platform captures the litter, as DutchNews reported.

Preliminary tests of the project, which has taken three years, show that the device is capable of ushering 80 percent of the canal’s plastic waste to its banks. Furthermore, it works 24 hours a day and does not interfere with shipping or wildlife, according to The Great Bubble Barrier.

“More than two-thirds of plastics in the ocean comes out of rivers and canals – so if you have to intercept it, why not do it in the rivers?” said Philip Ehrhorn, co-inventor of the technology, as The Guardian reported. “You can’t put a physical barrier in a canal: it has to be open for wildlife and recreation.”

The Great Bubble Barrier will supplement current cleanup efforts in Amsterdam. Each year, a team of five garbage boats removes nearly 92,600 pounds of trash from the city’s waterways, but small pieces of trash and plastic at the bottom of the canals simply slip through the nets.

“Plastic in our water is becoming an increasing problem [and] has profound effects on the quality of our water and therefore on everything that lives in or near the water,” said Sander Mager, a board member of The Great Bubble Barrier, at the launch, as DutchNews reported. “This is precisely why it is important for the water management board to collaborate intensively with others to make a stand against this socially urgent problem.”

The trash collected by The Great Bubble Barrier will be collected separately from what the garbage boats collect. The plastics action group Schone Rivieren, which translates to Clean Rivers, will analyze the waste.

“Amsterdam’s canals have enormous appeal,” said Marieke van Doorninck, head of sustainability for Amsterdam council, as The Guardian reported. “But when you think of them, you don’t think about plastic bottles and bags in the water. The bubble barrier will mean fewer plastics reach the ocean, and is a step towards better regulation of our ecosystem, to the benefit of man, beast and environment.”

LINK:  https://www.ecowatch.com/bubble-barrier-plastic-waste-2641304998.html?utm_source=EcoWatch+List&utm_campaign=bc0e0f36fd-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_49c7d43dc9-bc0e0f36fd-86118937

 

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