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Judge Rules Against Trump’s Attempt to Log in America’s Largest National Forest

Judge Rules Against Trump’s Attempt to Log in America’s Largest National Forest
A federal judge in Alaska ruled late Wednesday against a Trump administration plan to open 1.8 million acres of America’s largest national forest to logging.

“The magnificent, ancient forests of the Tongass just got a reprieve from the chain saws,” Randi Spivak, public lands director at the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), said in the Earthjustice press release. “We’re thrilled the court agreed that the Trump administration broke the law when it approved cutting thousands of acres of old-growth trees. It’s critical to protect our remaining old-growth forests to have any chance of stopping the extinction crisis and slowing climate change.”

CBD was one of eight conservation groups that challenged the plan with representation from Earthjustice, according to fellow plaintiff the National Audubon Society. The groups, also including Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, Alaska Rainforest Defenders, Defenders of Wildlife, Sierra Club, Alaska Wilderness League and the Natural Resources Defense Council, argued that it violated NEPA, which allows people to weigh in on major infrastructure projects that will impact their community. Prince of Wales Island is an important location for subsistence hunting and fishing, but the Forest Service did not say in its plans where logging would take place, which meant it was impossible for the local community to meaningfully respond to the plans.

Gleason also ruled that the plan violated the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, which requires federal agencies to determine how projects on public lands will impact those who use the lands for subsistence, according to The Audubon Society.

The ruling comes as the Trump administration is proposing changes to NEPA that would drastically weaken the landmark environmental law by, among other things, limiting the length of the review process, exempting certain projects from any review and allowing federal agencies to ignore a project’s climate impacts.

Alaska Wilderness League conservation director Kristen Miller said that Wednesday’s ruling showed the importance of NEPA.

The ultimate fate of the Forest Service project is not yet known, as Judge Gleason did not yet decide on a legal remedy for the plaintiffs’ suit. The service did not respond to requests for comment from either Courthouse News Service or The Hill.

A bald eagle in the forest along the shoreline of Takatz Bay on Baranof Island, Tongass National Forest, Alaska on July 13, 2019. Wolfgang Kaehler / LightRocket via Getty Images

 

Source:  EcoWatch

By:  Olivia RosaneMar. 13, 2020 07:44AM EST

LINK:  https://www.ecowatch.com/national-forest-trump-logging-tongass-2645476974.html

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