nav-left cat-right
cat-right

West Virginia’s Natural Gas Industry Keeps Pushing...

Companies are deducting “post-production” costs or creating shell companies to reduce royalty payments. The firms say they have done nothing wrong. This article was produced in partnership with the Charleston Gazette-Mail, which is a member of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network. For decades, Arnold and Mary Richards collected monthly royalty checks — most recently from $1,000 to $1,500 — for the natural gas sucked up...

Why Plans to Turn America’s Rust Belt into a New P...

The petrochemical industry anticipates spending a total of over $200 billion on factories, pipelines, and other infrastructure in the U.S. that will rely on shale gas, the American Chemistry Council announced in September. Construction is already underway at many sites. This building spree would dramatically expand the Gulf Coast’s petrochemical corridor (known locally as “Cancer Alley”) — and establish a new plastics and...

Even most Americans in coal-reliant states prefer ...

A large majority of Americans in coal-heavy states favor increasing renewable energy use. Most would also be willing to buy solar panels for their own use, and a plurality would be willing to pay an additional $5 a month to get energy from fully renewable sources, according to a survey from Consumer Reports. The consumer advocacy group spoke with 1,200 Americans, including 400 residents of coal-reliant states: Illinois,...

Driven by Trump Policy Changes, Fracking Booms on ...

The administration is auctioning off millions of acres of drilling rights and rolling back regulations, raising environmental concerns in states like Wyoming. CONVERSE COUNTY, Wyo. — The parade of trailer trucks rolling through Jay Butler’s dusty ranch is a precursor to a new fracking boom on the vast federal lands of Wyoming and across the West. Reversing a trend in the final years of the Obama presidency, the Trump...

Behind Washington State’s ambitious carbon f...

With support from labor, scientists, doctors, and communities of color, I-1631’s backers hope the initiative will succeed where others have failed. Mt. Baker and the “Sisters” across Bellingham Bay. CREDIT: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images If Washington makes history by becoming the first state in the country to put a price on carbon emissions, it will largely be thanks to the efforts of a diverse...

Solar power on the rise in Ohio but installation c...

They’re on the governor’s home. Bob Evans’ corporate headquarters has them. So does the Ikea store near Polaris. In Franklin County alone, there are more than 200 registered sites equipped with solar panels, according to the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio. Statewide, there are more than 2,600. There is no requirement to register. Kevin Eigel believes there is likely twice that number in Franklin County. He started his...

Exelon CEO: Carbon price preferable to ‘band...

The CEO of the nation’s largest nuclear operator on Monday renewed his call for a price on carbon emissions, saying it would be preferable to current state subsidies for nuclear plants or a federal plant bailout contemplated by the White House. “What we’re doing right now is band-aids,” Exelon CEO Chris Crane said at an event in Washington. “What we need to do is a regional or national...

Climate reality requires starting at home: Weaning...

Fossil fuels have to go. It didn’t take the latest report from the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to tell us that: we’ve known it for three decades. But the report makes it clearer than ever: Burning billions of tons of coal, oil, and natural gas is creating a thickening blanket over the Earth, holding in its heat and disrupting all kinds of systems, from oceans temperatures and chemistry to storm patterns,...

Climate Change Economists Win Nobel Prize

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics to a duo for their work on how the world can achieve sustainable growth. The prize was divided equally to William D. Nordhaus of Yale University and to Paul M. Romer of New York University’s Stern School of Business, both Americans, who have “designed methods for addressing some of our time’s most basic and pressing questions...

Don’t Frack So Close to Me: Colorado to Vote on Dr...

Coloradans will vote on a ballot initiative in November that requires new oil and gas projects to be set back at least 2,500 feet from occupied buildings. If approved, the measure—known as both Initiative 97 and Proposition 112—would mark a major change from their state’s current limits: 500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from schools. As sociologists who have researched oil and gas drilling in the communities that...

The US would suffer some of the biggest costs of c...

The exact cost estimates vary, but the US consistently ranks near the top. Climate change is a classic tragedy of the commons: every country acting in its own self-interest contributes to depleting a joint resource, making the world worse for everyone. If you’ve ever lived with bad roommates, the concept will be easy to grasp. The social cost of carbon (or SCC) is a way to put a price tag on the result of that tragedy,...

Energy efficiency is fundamentally undervalued, RM...

Dive Brief: A new paper by the cofounder and chief scientist of the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) seeks to challenge conventional wisdom when it comes to energy efficiency, positing that the size and cost of the potential resource base is much larger and cheaper than previously believed. The misunderstanding is fundamental, according to physicist Amory Lovins. By examining individual energy-consuming technologies, rather...

Dire Climate Change Warnings Cut From Trump Power-...

Warnings about potentially severe consequences of climate change were deleted from a Trump administration plan to weaken curbs on power plant emissions during a White House review. Drafts had devoted more than 500 words to highlighting the impacts — more heat waves, intense hurricanes, heavy rainfalls, floods and water pollution — as part of the proposal to replace Obama-era restrictions on greenhouse gas...

The Forecast for Jobs in Appalachian Ohio Looks Su...

Along the Ohio River east of Cincinnati lies The Point, a huge industrial park with room for new tenants. Hundreds of acres with access to the river and the railroad sit ready for development. And while the space would be appropriate for any number of businesses, the residents of Lawrence County have something particular in mind: a solar manufacturing hub to support what would be the biggest solar farm in this corner of the...

Opinion: The Next Financial Crisis Lurks Undergrou...

Fueled by debt and years of easy credit, America’s energy boom is on shaky footing. About 20 years ago, an entrepreneur named George Mitchell proved that it was possible to get lots of oil and gas out of parts of the earth long thought to be sucked dry, by injecting liquid at high pressure into a horizontal well below the surface. About 10 years ago, fracking — the common term for this process — began in earnest. In that...