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No bidders for coal leases inside Ohio national fo...

NELSONVILLE, Ohio (AP) — The federal government says it received no bids during a competitive lease sale for coal underneath about 430 acres of Ohio’s Wayne National Forest. The Bureau of Land Management-Eastern States released the results of last week’s offering on Tuesday. Leases involved seven tracts in Perry and Morgan counties that contain an estimated 1.4 million tons of sub-surface mineable federal coal. The sale came...

States hit electric vehicle owners with high fees,...

Key Points A new Consumer Reports analysis shows that of the 26 states have EV fees, 11 charge more than owners of gas-powered cars pay in gas taxes. The move in some states to higher EV fees has been led by the American Legislative Exchange Council a think tank advocating policies of limited government, free markets, and federalism. Electric vehicles accounted for 1.8% of the market share in the U.S. in March of 2019....

Solar Company Sees Some Benefit From Ohio’s ...

While critics of Ohio’s recent nuclear bailout are moving toward a referendum to repeal the law, the new policy has won some support from an unusual source. Greg Kuss, president of Solar Vision in Worthington, says that increased charges to electric customers will make solar an economical option. “Now, the price of installing solar is comparable with what you’d be paying your local utilities,” Kuss says. Kuss says the cost...

AEP decision contributes to loss of 200 coal and c...

Shelly Schultz, Zanesville Times RecorderPublished 12:53 p.m. ET Sept. 10, 2019 | Updated 3:41 p.m. ET Sept. 10, 2019 Buy PhotoA coal truck heads toward AEP’s Conesville power plant on Tuesday. The coal mines that feed the plant will have to lay off much of its staff due to the plants closure next spring. (Photo: Chris Crook/Times Recorder) CONESVILLE – More than 200 area residents will be out of work by the end of...

Cap and Adapt: A Failsafe Approach to the Climate ...

The utter peril that the United States and all of humanity now face from global climate change is evident to anyone paying attention. The succession of extraordinary climate catastrophes over recent years is continual, increasing and widespread. Extreme weather events are becoming more intense and more frequent to the point that many regions now suffer back-to-back and even concurrent disasters. Emergency response capacity...

The Green New Deal Battles Business as Usual. Both...

The stories we tell ourselves become the reality of our experience. Global elites are now offering ordinary people two salvation stories for our digital entertainment.Both delusional stories are being served on the Internet with bags of virtual popcorn. One is the so-called Green New Deal (GND), and the other is Business As Usual (BAU), which comes in both liberal and autocratic formats. Both are actively competing for our...

Ad invokes spurious Chinese invasion of Ohio to tr...

What can nearly $1 million buy? For one, the sleaziest scare ad in recent memory in Ohio, seeking to keep a referendum off the November 2020 ballot on whether to overturn House Bill 6, the recently passed bailout bill for FirstEnergy’s two nuclear plants. The one-minute ad, populated by alarming pictures of the Chinese military, warns, “The Chinese government is quietly invading our American electrical grid” and “coming for...

Foreign investors selling their stakes in Canada’s...

Capital keeps marching out of Canada’s oil industry, with Kinder Morgan Inc.’s sale of its remaining holdings in the country on Wednesday adding to more than $30 billion of foreign-company divestitures in the past three years. Pembina Pipeline Corp., based in Calgary, is snapping up Kinder’s Canadian assets and a cross-border pipeline in a $3.3 billion deal. For Houston-based Kinder, the deal completes an exit from a country...

‘Coal is over’: the miners rooting for...

Appalachia’s main industry is dying and some workers are looking to a new economic promise after Trump’s proves empty. Set in a wooded valley between the Tug Fork river and the Mate creek, Matewan, West Virginia, was the site of the 1920 Matewan massacre, a shootout between pro-union coalminers and coal company agents that left 10 people dead and triggered one of the most brutal fights over the future of the coal industry in...

The wheels come off shale oil

  A flurry of coverage about the gloom and outright calamity in the shale oil business appeared last week. Low prices continue to dog the industry. But so does lack of investor interest in financing loss-making operations for yet another season. Plunging stock prices portend more bankruptcies if circumstances don’t change. I received considerable pushback last January when I asked whether U.S. shale oil had entered a...

Utilities reaping financial benefits from coal pla...

Power generators across the U.S. are not only sticking to plans to retire coal-fired power plants despite the pro-coal Trump administration, they are touting the cost savings of doing so while pushing a further transition away from the fuel. Several utilities with the largest planned coal plant retirements confirmed they are not changing course after the administration finished the Affordable Clean Energy in mid-June,...

$10 billion for climate resiliency included in new...

A massive new transportation bill with bipartisan backing contains major climate change components in a historic first that could have implications for decarbonizing national infrastructure. Dubbed “America’s Transportation Infrastructure Act,” the highway bill from the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee (EPW) approved Tuesday would put billions towards combatting greenhouse gas emissions and promoting resiliency....

BUT AT WHAT COST? -To many, the pipelines are a li...

The first signs of change came to Belmont County several years ago, as natural gas extraction company trucks rumbled over the roads. Next came drilling rigs and pipelines for hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. To many, the pipelines are a lifeline in impoverished Appalachia, bringing in jobs and money. Despite the economic boom, environmentalists and some residents are questioning the health and safety of...

The ‘war on coal’ myth

Environmental regulations aren’t the reason that coal is falling off the map. Is environmental extremism causing the decline of the American coal industry? A look at the economics shows that coal has been beaten fair and square in the marketplace by cheaper and cleaner alternatives. The best way to support coal communities is to confront these economic realities, rather than creating a divisive and false narrative...

Utilities gave $320K to Ohio House members who vot...

Members of the Ohio House who voted in favor of a bill to bail out uncompetitive coal and nuclear power plants received over $320,000 in campaign money from four utilities that will benefit financially from the bill’s passage. American Electric Power (AEP), Dayton Power & Light (and it’s parent company AES Corporation), Duke Energy, and FirstEnergy Corp.’s PACs have targeted Ohio with nearly $1.65 million in campaign...