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States can lead the way on climate change policy a...

As Trump guts environmental protections, states must take charge on smart climate policy. The world’s leading panel of climate experts sounded the alarm this week that we are running out of time to get rising temperatures under control. Its latest report calls for “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented” steps to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, from worsening wildfires and extreme drought to rising sea levels and...

Editorial: United States can’t afford to wai...

Buried in a report from the National Highway Safety Transportation Administration of President Donald Trump is an acknowledgement that the planet is on course to warm by 6 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100. That could be disastrous, and carbon emissions from car and truck tailpipes is contributing to that. This acknowledgement, from a Republican environmental administration, no less, weakens the case that was already not fully...

Editorial: The government needs to take action aga...

On Oct. 8, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report saying humanity has until 2030 to prevent a disastrous level of global warming. If we continue on the same path, by 2030 the Earth will have warmed by 1.5 degrees Celsius. This may not seem like a lot, but a temperature increase of this magnitude would drastically increase “climate-related risks to health, livelihoods, food security, water...

Climate reality requires starting at home: Weaning...

Fossil fuels have to go. It didn’t take the latest report from the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to tell us that: we’ve known it for three decades. But the report makes it clearer than ever: Burning billions of tons of coal, oil, and natural gas is creating a thickening blanket over the Earth, holding in its heat and disrupting all kinds of systems, from oceans temperatures and chemistry to storm patterns,...

Climate Change Economists Win Nobel Prize

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economics to a duo for their work on how the world can achieve sustainable growth. The prize was divided equally to William D. Nordhaus of Yale University and to Paul M. Romer of New York University’s Stern School of Business, both Americans, who have “designed methods for addressing some of our time’s most basic and pressing questions...

Don’t Frack So Close to Me: Colorado to Vote on Dr...

Coloradans will vote on a ballot initiative in November that requires new oil and gas projects to be set back at least 2,500 feet from occupied buildings. If approved, the measure—known as both Initiative 97 and Proposition 112—would mark a major change from their state’s current limits: 500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from schools. As sociologists who have researched oil and gas drilling in the communities that...

DOE spent more than $500M on dead projects

CARBON CAPTURE Nearly half the $2.7 billion in fossil research money spent by the Department of Energy over the last seven years supported nine carbon capture demonstration projects, the majority of which were canceled or withdrawn, according to a report yesterday from the Government Accountability Office. The GAO analysis highlights an ongoing debate about carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS). Opponents say...

The US would suffer some of the biggest costs of c...

The exact cost estimates vary, but the US consistently ranks near the top. Climate change is a classic tragedy of the commons: every country acting in its own self-interest contributes to depleting a joint resource, making the world worse for everyone. If you’ve ever lived with bad roommates, the concept will be easy to grasp. The social cost of carbon (or SCC) is a way to put a price tag on the result of that tragedy,...

Former Koch staffer appointed to key EPA position

The agency is stocked full of industry insiders. The Environmental Protection Agency has hired a former Koch Industries staffer who worked on water and chemical policy to fill a key role within the agency, continuing a Trump administration trend of appointing company insiders to oversee the industries they are meant to regulate. David Dunlap, a former Koch chemical engineer who has served as director of policy and regulatory...

Trump Administration Prepares a Major Weakening of...

The Trump administration has completed a detailed legal proposal to dramatically weaken a major environmental regulation covering mercury, a toxic chemical emitted from coal-burning power plants, according to a person who has seen the document but is not authorized to speak publicly about it. The proposal would not eliminate the mercury regulation entirely, but it is designed to put in place the legal justification for the...

Appalachia Could Get a Giant Solar Farm, If Ohio R...

AEP’s plan would bring jobs to an impoverished region, but its structure would break the established regulatory mold in a state that has pushed back on renewables. Appalachian Ohio, a region hurt by the decline of coal, may become home to one of the largest solar projects east of the Rockies. American Electric Power submitted a plan Thursday evening to work with two developers to build 400 megawatts of solar in...

Designing Greener Streets Starts With Finding Room...

City streets and sidewalks in the U.S. have been engineered for decades to keep vehicle occupants and pedestrians safe. If streets include trees at all, they might be planted in small sidewalk pits, where, if constrained and with little water, they live only three to 10 years on average. Until recently, U.S. streets have also lacked cycle tracks—paths exclusively for bicycles between the road and the sidewalk, protected from...

Trump administration sees a 7-degreeF (4-C) rise i...

Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: On its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous seven degrees by the end of this century. A rise of seven degrees Fahrenheit, or about four degrees Celsius, compared with preindustrial levels would be catastrophic, according to scientists. Many coral reefs would dissolve in increasingly acidic oceans....

Prepare for 10 Feet of Sea Level Rise, California ...

Though an extreme scenario, it should be factored in to coastal infrastructure planning, new guidance suggests California coastal cities should be prepared for the possibility that oceans will rise more than 10 feet by 2100 and submerge parts of beach towns, the state Coastal Commission warns in new draft guidance. The powerful agency, which oversees most development along 1,100 miles of coast, will consider approving the...

‘We’re moving to higher ground’:...

By the end of this century, sea level rises alone could displace 13m people. Many states will have to grapple with hordes of residents seeking dry ground. But, as one expert says, ‘No state is unaffected by this’   After her house flooded for the third year in a row, Elizabeth Boineau was ready to flee. She packed her possessions into dozens of boxes, tried not to think of the mold and mildew-covered furniture and...