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USGS Estimates 214 trillion Cubic Feet of Natural ...

USGS Estimates 214 trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas in Appalachian Basin Formations www.usgs.gov USGS Updates Appalachian Basin Natural Gas Assessments New Estimates for Marcellus and Point Pleasant-Utica Shales The Marcellus Shale and Point Pleasant-Utica Shale formations of the Appalachian Basin contain an estimated mean of 214 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable continuous resources of natural...

Dangerous oil and gas industry exemption slipped i...

A landmark five-year, $287 billion highway bill moving in the Senate contains a poison pill provision that must be eliminated. The measure — which would be the largest highway legislation in history — is noteworthy for its inclusion of the first climate title in a surface transportation bill. The climate provisions are an important step toward addressing the urgent need to reduce transportation emissions and invest in...

Solar Company Sees Some Benefit From Ohio’s ...

While critics of Ohio’s recent nuclear bailout are moving toward a referendum to repeal the law, the new policy has won some support from an unusual source. Greg Kuss, president of Solar Vision in Worthington, says that increased charges to electric customers will make solar an economical option. “Now, the price of installing solar is comparable with what you’d be paying your local utilities,” Kuss says. Kuss says the cost...

AEP decision contributes to loss of 200 coal and c...

Shelly Schultz, Zanesville Times RecorderPublished 12:53 p.m. ET Sept. 10, 2019 | Updated 3:41 p.m. ET Sept. 10, 2019 Buy PhotoA coal truck heads toward AEP’s Conesville power plant on Tuesday. The coal mines that feed the plant will have to lay off much of its staff due to the plants closure next spring. (Photo: Chris Crook/Times Recorder) CONESVILLE – More than 200 area residents will be out of work by the end of...

Inside Energy Questions: Is Fracking Dangerous?

There are many hazards associated with oil and gas development: air and water pollution, accidents, and threats to mental health. Clearly, oil and gas development can be dangerous, but HOW dangerous? And for whom? That’s what we will try to lay out in this story, with some important caveats to keep in mind: Some hazards are very likely to happen; Some hazards have a low probability of happening Some hazards are very...

Even Big Oil doesn’t like the EPA’s methane rollba...

Powerful members of the fossil fuel lobby support the Trump administration’s rollback, but not all of the industry is on board. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Thursday announced it will reverse Obama-era limitations on the greenhouse gas methane, which is far more potent than carbon dioxide and often associated with fracking. In a statement Thursday, EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said the Trump...

Fracking may be a bigger climate problem than we t...

A shale gas drilling rig, against the obligatory stock photo sunset.Shutterstock As greenhouse gases go, methane gets less attention than carbon dioxide, but it is a key contributor to climate change. Methane doesn’t stay in the atmosphere as long as CO2 and is reabsorbed into terrestrial cycles via chemical reactions within 12 years or so. But while it’s up there, it’s much more potent, trapping heat at roughly 84 times the...

The wheels come off shale oil

  A flurry of coverage about the gloom and outright calamity in the shale oil business appeared last week. Low prices continue to dog the industry. But so does lack of investor interest in financing loss-making operations for yet another season. Plunging stock prices portend more bankruptcies if circumstances don’t change. I received considerable pushback last January when I asked whether U.S. shale oil had entered a...

Utilities reaping financial benefits from coal pla...

Power generators across the U.S. are not only sticking to plans to retire coal-fired power plants despite the pro-coal Trump administration, they are touting the cost savings of doing so while pushing a further transition away from the fuel. Several utilities with the largest planned coal plant retirements confirmed they are not changing course after the administration finished the Affordable Clean Energy in mid-June,...

Report: ‘No Evidence That Fracking Can Operate Wit...

In 2010 when I first started writing about hydraulic fracturing — the process of blasting a cocktail of water and chemicals into shale to release trapped hydrocarbons — there were more questions than answers about environmental and public-health threats. That same year Josh Fox’s documentary Gasland, which featured tap water bursting into flames, grabbed the public’s attention. Suddenly the term fracking — little...

Trump drilling leases could create more climate po...

US has offered close to 378m acres of public lands and waters for oil and gas leasing since Trump took office through April 2019 Donald Trump’s leases of public lands and waters for oil and gas drilling could lead to the production of more climate-warming pollution than the entire European Union contributes in a year, according to a new report. The Wilderness Society estimates heat-trapping emissions from extracting and...

Natural gas leaks are a much bigger problem than w...

Natural gas has been touted as a green energy source by some because, when burned for fuel, it emits less CO2 than coal. But before that happens, leaks from across the natural gas supply chain — from the drilling process to gas stoves — can unintentionally vent methane into the atmosphere. That’s especially bad news, since methane is roughly 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than CO2. And, according to a new study in...

BUT AT WHAT COST? -To many, the pipelines are a li...

The first signs of change came to Belmont County several years ago, as natural gas extraction company trucks rumbled over the roads. Next came drilling rigs and pipelines for hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. To many, the pipelines are a lifeline in impoverished Appalachia, bringing in jobs and money. Despite the economic boom, environmentalists and some residents are questioning the health and safety of...

The ‘war on coal’ myth

Environmental regulations aren’t the reason that coal is falling off the map. Is environmental extremism causing the decline of the American coal industry? A look at the economics shows that coal has been beaten fair and square in the marketplace by cheaper and cleaner alternatives. The best way to support coal communities is to confront these economic realities, rather than creating a divisive and false narrative...

Fracking in Ohio: State law gives energy companies...

Deciding what happens on private property might seem like a basic right. But when it comes to fracking, Ohio and other oil and gas-producing states have laws that can force landowners to lease their underground mineral rights to energy companies. That’s what happened to Patrick Hunkler and his wife, Jean Backs. It began in 2010, when a landman for an energy company knocked on their door. Hunkler didn’t know much about...