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Unsafe Lead Levels in Tap Water Not Limited to Fli...

In Sebring, Ohio, routine laboratory tests last August found unsafe levels of lead in the town’s drinking water after workers stopped adding a chemical to keep lead water pipes from corroding. Five months passed before the city told pregnant women and children not to drink the water, and shut down taps and fountains in schools. In 2001, after Washington, D.C., changed how it disinfected drinking water, lead in tap water at...

10 Things They Won’t Tell You About the Flin...

News of the poisoned water crisis in Flint has reached a wide audience around the world. The basics are now known: The Republican governor, Rick Snyder, nullified the free elections in Flint, deposed the mayor and city council, then appointed his own man to run the city. To save money, they decided to unhook the people of Flint from their fresh water drinking source, Lake Huron, and instead, make the public drink from the...

The heroic professor who helped uncover the Flint ...

In Flint, Mich., there is a famous block of concrete that for decades has served as a community message board. Like an old-school Facebook feed, residents use it to post personal news, images, upcoming events and commentary in sprawling graffiti. This week, several residents went to “The Block” (or “The Rock,” depending on whom you ask) with a message. In big, black capital letters they painted: “YOU WANT OUR TRUST?? WE WANT...

The Water Next Time: Professor Who Helped Expose C...

When Marc Edwards opens his mouth, dangerous things come out. Marc Edwards, a professor of civil engineering at Virginia Tech, has been investigating dangerously high lead levels in the Flint, Mich., water supply. “The agencies paid to protect these people weren’t solving the problem,” he says. “They were the problem. What faculty person out there is going to take on” the government? In 2003 the...

Cancer preys on rural Americans

MARIANNA, ARK. – In the home of the blues, amid dying towns, gravel back roads and endless Mississippi Delta farmland, cancer grows, spreads and kills mercilessly — even the types that can be caught or stopped with well-known screening tests. Ruby Huffman, 73, got her first colonoscopy only after passing blood, and it found a huge cancerous tumor. Rita Stiles, 61, went at least a decade without a mammogram. And Tina...

Study finds toxic nail-polish chemicals in women’s...

According to a new study from Duke University and the Environmental Working Group (EWG), painting your nails doesn’t just give it a nice coat of color— it also may release an endocrine-disrupting chemical into the body. The study found that women who painted their nails with nail products including triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) had a metabolite of the chemical in their bodies 10 to 14 hours later. Their levels of diphenyl...

From boats to buses, Minnesota program helps clean...

While an emissions scandal involving Volkswagen has diesel powertrains under increased scrutiny, a Minnesota program is helping to clear the air, one engine at a time. Becky Sue is a gritty 38-year-old tugboat that once ran a 600 horsepower diesel engine while pushing commodities to different Mississippi River docks in and around St. Paul, belching out tons of pollutants annually. This week, the Becky Sue’s owner,...

Amid VW scandal, polluted Paris asks if time to du...

PARIS (AP) — Guidebooks rarely mention it, but Paris is one of the most polluted cities in the rich world. The Eiffel Tower is periodically shrouded in smog, and there’s one key culprit: France’s disproportionately heavy reliance on diesel fuel. Critics are increasingly questioning the need for diesel vehicles, especially after last week’s discovery that Volkswagen tricked drivers worldwide into thinking...

Government chips away at fluoride standard

You’ve been getting too much of a good thing for years. There’s more than you need of fluoride, the cavity-fighting additive in your toothpaste, mouth rinse and tap water, the federal government said yesterday, and in some cases it’s even causing white spots and streaks on your teeth. The Department of Health and Human Services released a new optimal fluoride level in drinking water yesterday — a single level of 0.7...

Beijing to Shut All Major Coal Power Plants to Cut...

(Bloomberg) — Beijing, where pollution averaged more than twice China’s national standard last year, will close the last of its four major coal-fired power plants next year. The capital city will shutter China Huaneng Group Corp.’s 845-megawatt power plant in 2016, after last week closing plants owned by Guohua Electric Power Corp. and Beijing Energy Investment Holding Co., according to a statement Monday on the...

Rob Portman bucks global-warming rule, wants state...

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Ohio’s Rob Portman has a plan to help residents in states where electricity costs could go up under a White House plan to address global warming: Just say no. The Republican U.S. senator would let states opt out of carbon-emission regulations if their governors or state legislatures could show that costs would rise from switching from coal, a leading source of greenhouse gas emissions, to...

How Toxins Are Changing Childhood

The number of (largely untested) chemicals in our environment is on the rise, as are the rates of autism, cancer, and other serious health problems affecting kids. KIWI investigates
 this “silent pandemic”—and reveals how parents can fight back. When Josephine Wilson, 37, of Princeton, New Jersey, took her 1-year-old daughter to the pediatrician for a routine visit in July 2013, a flyer for a study on flame retardants in...

Air Pollution Linked to Rising ADHD Cases

Air pollution might be linked to increasing cases of ADHD in children, a study of New York City women and children found. Exposure to pollution before birth might be the key, researchers from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health found, after a look at prenatal levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a component of air pollution, and ADHD symptoms in children later in life. Mothers exposed to...

Climate change policies pay for themselves, study ...

An MIT climate change study released Sunday indicates the cost of slashing coal-fired carbon emissions would be offset by reduced spending on public health. The EPA-funded study examined climate change policies similar to those proposed by the Obama administration in June. Washington — President Obama’s controversial plan to phase out coal and slash carbon emissions is an expensive one. But a new study suggests it could be...

Chemicals and Pollutants in the Environment Affect...

Several Articles: Pesticides seem to increase autism risk FRESNO, Calif. — A new study released yesterday suggests that pregnant women who live near agricultural fields where pesticides are sprayed are at increased risk of having a child with autism. The study by the University of California-Davis, MIND Institute found that mothers exposed to organophosphates had a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism. The...