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Green Voices Rising

This page’s content is from the Environmental subgroup of
Strong Voices Rising

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Greetings! 4/6/2017

Some updates:

1. The next Strong Voices Rising meeting is Wednesday Thursday, April 19, 7-9 pm, 621 Mt. Vernon Rd. (Newark City Schools’ District Office, located in the old Roosevelt Middle School Building; turn into Quentin St. and park in lot at back of building; enter building from the back; meeting will be in first room on the left). 

Jennifer Brunner, Ohio appeals court judge and former Ohio Secretary of State, has graciously agreed to speak to SVR about the state of elections in Ohio. She will address three questions: 1. What are the ways in which people can be disenfranchised in Ohio, and what can we do to protect voting rights on a local and state level?; 2. How can we address gerrymandering on a state level?; 3. What can we do on a local level to protect the integrity of elections? 

The first hour of the meeting will be Judge Brunner’s talk; the second half will be an opportunity to break into issues groups. So the next Green Voices Rising meeting will occur at 8 pm.

2. When our group meets at this time, we can share updates on projects and research as discussed at our previous meeting. And if you have anything else you’d like to add to the agenda or otherwise get out of the meeting, please don’t hesitate to let me know.

3. April is a big month for eco-minded events (though every day should be Earth Day, right?!). Here’s a list of some local happenings, from service opportunities and film screenings to celebrations and protests. Those listed in GREEN (also at the end of this email) are organized by fellow SVR/GVR members. Note that the demonstrations on the corner of Broadway and Main have environmental themes on 4/8, 4/22 and 4/29–would be great for our group to show support. If there are other environmental events that you know of, please add them to the google doc, as it is editable by anyone with the link. 

Thanks! 

Kim

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For your information…

Logo for Citizens Climate Lobby 2015.png
Citizens’ Climate Lobby is an international grassroots environmental group that trains and supports volunteers to build relationships with their elected representatives in order to influence climate policy. Operating since 2007, the goal of CCL is to build political support across party lines to put a price on carbon, specifically a revenue neutral carbon fee and dividend at the national level. CCL is supported by notable climate scientists James Hansen, Katharine Hayhoe, and Daniel Kammen. CCL’s advisory board also includes former Secretary of State George Shultz, former US Representative Bob Inglis, actor Don Cheadle, and RESULTS founder Sam Daley-Harris.

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March 12, 2017 – Meeting Recap

Thanks to all who attended our meeting this past Sunday–we had some great conversation and walked away with new information and ideas for action. And a huge thank you to Trish Demeter of Ohio Environmental Council, for an engaging crash-course on the state of energy in Ohio, including how we can be most effective when interacting with our elected officials. 

A recap of the meeting:

– We opened by stating our priorities for getting together: 

  • Education: Environment is a big topic. Many of us don’t have a science or policy background, so we want to become better informed. By inviting speakers, taking field trips and doing our own research then sharing out, we can increase our understanding of complex environmental issues. Also key: conversations between group members–the more informed among us can help educate the newbies.
  • Action: We want to explore a range of actions, from individual things we can do right now to large-scale projects we can work on in teams. Doing something, anything—one phone call a week or one meaningful conversation with a climate skeptic—can make a difference.
  • Community: We are in good company, surrounded by others who care about the same things. We can support and strengthen one another during these challenging times.

– Trish spoke and answered questions on a range of energy issues. Some take-aways:

  • We are fortunate as Ohioans to be able to use rooftop solar or small wind projects; we have some choice about how we get our energy, which is not the case for every state.
  • Globally speaking, renewable energy is here now and it’s unstoppable.
  • In terms of its renewable energy portfolio (the percentage of energy pledged to come from renewables in the future), Ohio is lagging behind neighboring states like Michigan and Illinois.
  • After a two-year freeze of Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards, we are back on track as of Jan. 1, 2017, thanks to Kasich’s veto of a bill that would have continued to suspend those standards.
  • But standards are in danger again due to House Bill 114, which will essentially make standards voluntary; we should write or call our reps urging them to kill it in house. More background and talking points about HB 114: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dtIFU6oZfXYU1eBp1XJG_flspywRV-cIzrH6IdDN-ME/edit
  • In general there is always something happening at the state house that threatens clean energy. To combat this, we need to share our personal stories about our own clean energy efforts and why we care about this issue. State lawmakers can’t argue with our feelings. Writing letters to newspapers is also a powerful tool because our officials and neighbors read these.
  • One angle to play up is the idea of brain drain–since clean energy is not only here and now but also the future, we need strong state policies supporting those industries, to keep our kids here after college. We shouldn’t be falling behind other states in our region.
  • Clean energy standards have created thousands of jobs. Currently there are 200 solar-related companies in Ohio, and we are the #1 state for manufacturing of wind energy supplies.
  • Ohio Environmental Council’s website is a great resource to learn more and sign up for emails/action alerts: http://www.theoec.org/

– Carol Apacki, founder (along with her husband Ken) of Licking County Concerned Citizens, spoke about her journey to becoming an informed and passionate environmental activist. 

– We ended by sharing a list of potential projects: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-OlaHIweylI_BGpa-bBtJlnF5sNhp0hSYTup3fq1vuM/edit These are ideas for those of us who want to take concrete action now, in our community. Feel free to sign up or add ideas; this list will grow as we research the issues and think of ways to act. 

– We ran out of time to write postcards about HB 114, but please see Trish’s talking points (Below) and write or call when you can. 

Thanks again. If you have any feedback/comments/questions please email me. I’ll continue to be in touch with action alerts and updates as they roll in. 

Oh and expect to be added to the Green Voices Rising Facebook group, so we can chat, share articles and get to know one another. I realize there are a lot of FB groups to stay on top of, but this will give us a channel for more specific conversation about environmental issues/actions. 

Kim

P.S. Please let me know if you are unable to access the documents linked to in this and other emails. I’m using Google Drive to house things but if this is not convenient for you I am happy to use another method.

TALKING POINTS

  • We continue to applaud Governor Kasich and many members of the Ohio House and Senate for their support for in welcoming back Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards on January 1, 2017.
  • Governor Kasich clearly demonstrated that he has a vision for Ohio’s clean energy future. By vetoing House Bill 554, the Governor provided for the reinstatement of Ohio’s renewable energy and energy efficiency standards that were working to create jobs, grow the economy, and reduce harmful emissions.
  • Now, just a few short weeks later, members of the Ohio House are ignoring the fact that debate is closed on the issue. The state of Ohio has renewed its commitment to advancing our energy policy.
  • The introduction of House Bill 144 on Tuesday, March 7, shows that some Ohio lawmakers are drastically out of touch with their constituents. Ohioans of all political persuasions support cleaner energy sources that reduce pollution and save consumers money.
  • Some members of the Ohio legislature are proud to bring you more of the same. Will Ohio embrace this opportunity to be a leader, or we will allow ourselves to be left behind once again?
  • It is time to move past the debate over clean energy standards and address Ohio’s overwhelming potential to develop an innovative energy strategy that will make us a leader in the region.
  • In a period of uncertain times, clean energy businesses were told they could invest in Ohio again with certainty and confidence. So why would we pull the rug out from under these job-creating companies?
  • Politics and personalities aside, Ohio has an opportunity to create a clean energy future that will protect our health, preserve our environment, and grow our economy. We should be looking forward, not creating policy with one eye in the rear-view mirror.

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SVR environment: 3/12 meeting and updates

On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 11:20 AM Kimberly Byce wrote:

Good morning!

 A few updates: 

 First, a reminder that our meeting will be this Sunday, March 12, from 3:30-4:45 in the United Church of Granville annex building (to the right, if you are looking at the church from Broadway). We’ll hear from Trish Demeter of the Ohio Environmental Council about energy issues in our state. We’ll also discuss local projects we can start working on–bring your ideas!–and we’ll end the meeting by writing some postcards. I’m excited to get to know other environmentalists in our community, as we learn together and find ways to make a stand. 

 Second, the steering committee (me, Susan King, Carol Apacki–anyone is welcome to join us, just let me know) met this week with a representative of the Environmental Defense Fund, James O’Bryant, as well as local environmental and energy consultant (and SVR member) Jane Harf. We learned that the Great Lakes inspire bipartisan support in Ohio, so Trump’s proposed EPA cuts in this area could be an effective rallying point for us. James and Jane provided several resources to help us get up to speed:

 “If we lose the EPA, we lose Lake Erie,” Great Lakes scientist says

 Trump slashes Great Lakes funding by 97 percent in early budget plan

 Spreadsheet showing proposed EPA budget

 Statement from Alliance for the Great Lakes on reports of massive EPA & Great Lakes program budget cuts

 I also recommend listening to the recent All Sides with Ann Fisher episode devoted to the Future of the EPA; it provides a nice overview of what’s at stake, particularly regarding the Great Lakes: http://radio.wosu.org/post/future-epa 

 Third, group member Jürgen Pape will have an environmental article in the Sentinel this week–I’m not sure which day. If someone sees it, please reply all here with a link.

 Finally, our resources document is growing–articles, news sources, organizations. Please peruse and add as you come across items of interest for the rest of the group.

 I’m looking forward to seeing you this Sunday. Please RSVP if you have a chance, so we know how many chairs to set up: https://www.facebook.com/events/810765095729435/ 

 Thank for reading!

 kim

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Send me articles and reports that you would like posted:
Email: kenapacki@gmail.com

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Want to write to state or federal Senators, Representatives, the Chief Executive?
Go to “Who to Contact” tab on homepage:
http://lcconcernedcitizens.org/wp-admin/post.php?post=2507&action=edit

Want to read President Trump’s Executive Orders?
Link to:  https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/executive-orders

Want to read proposed legislation and track status?
Link to: https://www.govtrack.us/
Also Link: https://www.congress.gov/

Connect with others in this community:

Indivisible: OH – 12 East facebook page link:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/572005566330782/
Email: indivisible:OH-12East@gmail.com

Strong Voices Rising facebook page link:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1094870793963161/

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  This article shows why we need to be a welcoming community:

Credit Joshua Bright for The New York Times

Credit Joshua Bright for The New York Times

How a Murder in Kansas Looks in Kolkata

 By  SANDIP ROY FEB. 28, 2017

KOLKATA, India — My friend says his cousin’s wedding has been called off. The wedding invitations had already been printed, but the bride got cold feet. She lives in India, the groom in the United States. She’d decided she did not want to move there anymore.

Once upon a time a bridegroom in the United States, an engineer or a banker, would have been a prize catch. This time his location was a handicap. Parents ask worriedly: “Is it safe? The things we are hearing …” The same friend says his sister in Mumbai was planning to visit him this summer but has decided to put it off. An American friend traveling in the northern Indian city of Amritsar says she keeps meeting people who say they want to visit America — “but not right now.”

They are not dreaming of America the way they used to in India — and this was happening even before Srinivas Kuchibhotla was gunned down in that bar in Kansas last week.

When I first arrived from India as a student in the early 1990s, America felt terribly alien. On my first night, I stared at the rows of car dealerships lining the main street of my small university town in Southern Illinois. They were closed yet brightly lit, with red, white and blue balloons drifting lazily above the gleaming cars. It was surreal, but it confirmed my idea of America — a country that always seemed open for business.

America was a confusing place. I did not realize that those friendly white-haired ladies inviting lonely students like me to church dinners were also trying to save my heathen soul. I did not understand how dishwashers worked. I could not drive a car. I could barely change a light bulb. I felt singularly ill equipped, but eager to explore.

I saw the exhilarating promise of America in the oddest places — the friendly drag queen with her Long Island iced tea at Two Hearts, the local gay bar; the dollar classics night at the campus movie theater where I watched “Back to the Future”; my messy attempt at a tandoori marinade to jazz up a Thanksgiving turkey. The American dream was not about striking it rich. It was about savoring the possibility of reinvention.

Several years later, I left a career in software engineering to become a writer. I do not think I would have had the courage to do that in India. In America, a profligate waste of an education did not seem so outlandish.

America was where I lived alone for the first time, in a little studio apartment with a cracked bathtub. America was a place, far away from the watchful eyes of aunts, uncles and neighbors, where it was possible to indulge in curious passions — bartending classes, poetry groups, quail hunting, sex. There were slurs and snide comments about smelling like curry, but it never crossed my mind that America needed to be made great again, because I had already been seduced by its own conviction in its greatness. Its projection of greatness had always been its most successful export.

Now that is changing. The country that taught me the meaning of privacy is considering demanding Facebook passwords at the border. From the outside it feels less like a darker country than like a more sullen one — one half of it apologetic, the other half suspicious. I am almost nostalgic for the naïve innocence of that other America I knew, where pleasant middle-aged women would tell me about a Dr. Patel from Mumbai and ask if I knew him. That America came with a sense of curiosity. The America I see now is shrunken, scared of its own shadow despite its bluster.

Growing up in India, we didn’t question the brain drain of our best and brightest (and even our second- and third-bests) to America. It was the natural order of things. President Trump’s new vision for America is suddenly forcing us to reconsider that assumption.

It’s too late for Srinivas Kuchibhotla, but somewhere out there young men like him are wondering if the American dream itself can be outsourced. Mr. Kuchibhotla’s mother has told reporters she does not want to let her younger son return to America. The father of Alok Madasani, his friend who was wounded in the shooting, said, “I appeal to all parents in India not to send their children to the U.S. in the present circumstances.”

Perhaps an unwelcoming America is not such a bad thing for the rest of the world. Now an Iranian can stand at the Oscars ceremony and lecture the United States on human rights. And a bride in India can snub her Indian-American husband-to-be. Five years ago, when I moved back to India, nobody understood why I would do such a thing. These days they nod understandingly.

But I still remember wistfully my first night in America, that car lot with its red, white and blue balloons and the American dream unspooling in front of me with such limitless abandon into the fluorescent night.

 

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Granville is a Welcoming Community
Granville Council Unanimously Passed Resolution
Township Trustees Approved Resolution by a vote 2 to 1.

BY:

RESOLUTION NO. 2017-12

A RESOLUTION DECLARING THAT THE VILLAGE AND TOWNSHIP OF GRANVILLE ARE WELCOMING COMMUNITIES, IN WHICH ALL OF OUR RESIDENTS AND VISITORS CAN FEEL WELCOMED, SAFE, AND ABLE TO FULLY PARTICIPATE IN, AND CONTRIBUTE POSITIVELY TO, OUR COMMUNITY’S SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC LIFE

WHEREAS, the historically diverse and evolving nature of the Granville community was noted by Dr. Dale T. Knobel in his Introduction to Granville, Ohio: A Study in Continuity and Change, in commemoration of the Granville Bicentennial in 2005; and he further observed: “The notion of community does not imply that the people who comprise it are all of a piece or of one mind,” and that “from the beginning in1805 Granville was not an ossified place, but a dynamic ‘community;” and

WHEREAS, Dr. Knobel continued: “Granville began to experience dramatic changes and evolve in its very first years. Successive waves of new people brought change, of course, because they came with new ideas, ambitions, and experiences. Likewise, the story of modern Granville is being written not only by long-standing residents but by newcomers and by the many who come and go;” and

WHEREAS, foreign-born Granville residents and members of the Denison University family have been and remain a vital part of our community, bringing fresh perspectives and new ideas, starting and supporting local businesses, and contributing to the vibrant community that we all value; and

WHEREAS, the Granville Police Department strives to follow a community policing policy, in order to promote effective relationships and collaborative partnerships between law enforcement and the public, and are complemented by the Granville Township Fire Department in making this a safer and stronger community for all;

WHEREAS, both Village and Township recognize that unlawful discrimination impedes the social and economic progress of a community by preventing its residents and visitors from fully contributing to the cultural, spiritual, social and economic life of the community; and positive contributions by all of the residents and the Denison community continue to play an essential role in the community’s growth, vitality and prosperity.

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Village and Township of Granville jointly desire to publicly express that the Granville community, both Village and Township is committed to ensuring that residents and visitors can feel welcomed, safe, and able to fully participate in, and contribute positively to, our community’s social and economic life. We encourage all
residents of Granville to redouble their efforts in reaching out and welcoming all those        who live in and visit our great community.

Passed this ______ day of ______________, 2017.

_______________________________     _________________________________  Melissa Hartfield, Village of Granville                    Melanie Schott, Granville Township Trustees       ATTEST:  ______________________________________  Mollie Prasher, Clerk of Council
APPROVED AS TO FORM:   ______________________________________

Link to the Village: http://www.granville.oh.us/meetings_and_agendas/

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   from the Newark Advocate:

Granville OKs ‘welcoming’ resolution

 Craig McDonald   , Reporter   Published 10:27 a.m. ET Feb. 16, 2017 |  Updated 20 hours ago

Mayor Melissa Hartfield: ‘This is not a sanctuary city status’

GRANVILLE – Following a spirited but civil discussion Wednesday night, Granville Council passed a resolution declaring the community a welcoming village and township.

The resolution was variously described by village officials as a “statement” or “aspirational” document, intended to make clear to minority or ethnic groups, or individuals living in or visiting Granville, they are in a “welcoming” community.

It was also stressed that because it was framed and adopted in a resolution or proclamation format, it is not legally binding.

The chamber and surrounding hallways were filled with residents and community leaders in support of, and in opposition to the declaration, some of the latter stating their fear the resolution was a first step toward or even tantamount to declaring Granville a “sanctuary city,” an assertion Mayor Melissa Hartfield and others stressed was not the case.

“There has been some misinformation going around and I’ve answered a number of emails and phone calls,” Hartfield said. “This is not for sanctuary status. We’re not interested in violating the law…If this was a sanctuary city proposal I’d feel very differently. I’m a rule follower and federal and state laws are important to me.”

Law Director Michael King, who drafted the welcoming resolution following a suggestion by council members Michelle Learner and Jacqueline O’Keefe, said, “This is not intended to be a Trojan horse or a first step toward a sanctuary city. If any of you came to me to draft legislation like that, I’d counsel strongly against it.”

Prior to public comment, Denison President Adam Weinberg, Township Trustee Kevin Bennett and Schools Superintendent Jeff Brown spoke in support of the resolution.

Weinberg thanked the village for putting the resolution forward, describing it as a document written by people in Granville, for people in Granville.

“Denison is a diverse place,” he said, “and our students and faculty are very diverse. As a college president, I do hear from our students, from black students and students from major cities, wondering if they are welcome. I welcome the community stepping up and saying you are welcome.”

Bennett admitted he was initially skeptical of the proposal, fearing it was “a pretext for a sanctuary city status or a thinly veiled response to take shots at President Trump.”

The trustee, who along with fellow members will likely consider adoption of the same resolution at their Feb. 22 meeting, said he found the actual document as written to be something else.

“I parsed this as hard as I would my own pre-nup, and I encourage council to unanimously authorize this resolution.”

Bennett also said he was taking first steps toward organizing a community event with Fred Abraham that would serve to bring together the residents of the Denison, village and township communities to “break bread.”

Superintendent Brown said, “Granville schools welcome all to Granville. As a public school system, we have an obligation to educate students to thrive in a globally diverse community… Diversity of thought enhances the learning process.”

The mayor then opened the floor for public comment. For approximately 90 minutes, residents (and at least one speaker from outside the Granville community) spoke for and against the resolution, several insisting the resolution was the same as a sanctuary city declaration.

Others stressed Granville is clearly welcoming and wondered why a declaration of that fact needed to be committed to paper.

But several speakers who were affiliated with Denison or who are residents in the community, provided personal anecdotes about uncivil or unwelcoming experiences they had encountered within the Granville community.

One resident remembered her Mexican-American brother-in-law visiting Granville for the Fourth of July celebration and being asked by a woman in front of CVS if he was “legal… Discrimination is alive and well in Granville,” she said.

Patricia Finkelman, wife of council member Dan Finkelman, read a statement from her husband, who she noted was absent from the meeting because his father had just passed away. “We are of the Jewish faith, and in Granville, we were a glaring example of difference. I want all to feel welcome… If I were present, I’d cast my vote in favor of this.”

Others speaking in support, wondered how simply writing you are welcoming “could hurt anybody?” Another asked, “If you believe we’re already welcoming, great. What’s the problem with formalizing it in writing?” Others said the resolution simply, “makes explicit something we in the dominant group might take for granted.”

But critics of the resolution described it as “disheartening,” “just a piece of paper,” and “just more liberal, feel good stuff.”

Another said, “The more you talk about diversity, the more you divide us,” and another declared, “You can’t legislate happiness.”

Trustee Dan VanNess said, “I have my reservations about this resolution. I think actions speak louder than words. If you pass a resolution, in two or three weeks it’s shoved into a resolution book.”

Olivia Aguilar, an assistant professor of environmental studies at Denison, said, “We need to show we’re welcoming. We’ve heard several examples of people feeling unwelcome tonight… We need to be attuned to these voices. We need to recognize they’re legitimate and people are having experiences we don’t want them to have.”

Russell Ginise said the resolution, “states what’s in our hearts. It’s for the people who don’t feel welcome. If it makes one person in the community feel welcome, then why wouldn’t you do that?”

After adjusting some of the language of the document, Law Director King stressed, “This is only a resolution and the functional equivalent of a proclamation. It’s an expression of council’s – and by extension the community’s – core values, or an aspirational document. It has no force of law or enforcement mechanism.”

Prior to voting, Council member Jeremy Johnson said when he first heard the proposal for such a statement, “I wasn’t in support, but I have found this inspiring. I can tell you, if this was a sanctuary city vote, my vote would be very different.”

Dan Finkelman arrived just in time for the vote and left soon after. He said, “When you lose your parent, and arguably your best friend, you realize how important it is to tell people what you feel about them.”

Council then adopted the resolution by a 6-0 vote (Councilman Matt McGowan being absent from the meeting).

Summing up, the mayor said, “I’d like to thank the people for the proper, polite conversation we’ve had. I’ve never felt more proud of our community than tonight.”

The resolution is expected to also come before Granville Township Trustees for consideration of adoption at their Feb. 22 meeting at 7 p.m. at the (sic Village) Township Administration Building, 1554 Columbus Road.

The adopted resolution reads:

A resolution declaring that the Village and Township of Granville are welcoming communities, in which all of our residents and visitors can feel welcomed, safe, and able to fully participate in, and contribute positively to, our community’s social and economic life

Whereas, the historically diverse and evolving nature of the Granville community was noted by Dr. Dale T. Knobel in his introduction to Granville, Ohio: A study in Continuity and Change, in commemoration of the Granville Bicentennial in 2005; and he further observed: “The notion of community does not imply that the people who compromise it are all of a piece or of one mind,” and that “from the beginning in 1805 Granville was not an ossified “place” but a dynamic “community” and

Whereas, Dr. Knobel continued: “Granville began to experience dramatic changes and evolve in its very first years. Successive waves of new people brought change, of course, because they came with new ideas, ambitions and experiences. Likewise, the story of modern Granville is being written not only by long-standing residents but by newcomers and by the many who come and go;” and

Whereas, foreign- and domestic-born Granville residents and members of the Denison University “family” have been and remain a vital part of our community, bringing fresh perspectives and new ideas, starting and supporting local businesses, and contributing to the vibrant community that we all value; and

Whereas, the Granville Police Department strives to follow a community policing policy, in which the law is upheld and enforced while promoting effective relationships and collaborative partnerships between law enforcement and the public, and are complemented by the Granville Township Fire Department in making this a safer and stronger community for all;

Whereas, both Village and Township recognize that unlawful discrimination impedes the social and economic progress of a community by preventing its residents and visitors from fully contributing to the cultural, spiritual, social and economic life of the community; and positive contributions by all of the residents and the Denison community continue to play an essential role in the community’s growth, vitality and prosperity,

Therefore be it resolved that the Village and Township of Granville jointly desire to publicly express that the Granville community, both Village and Township, is committed to ensuring that residents and visitors can feel welcome, safe and able to fully participate in, and contribute positively to, our community’s social and economic life. We encourage all residents of Granville to redouble their efforts in reaching out and welcoming all those who live in and visit our great community.”

 

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David Brooks takes on a big question

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/14/opinion/how-should-one-resist-the-trump-administration.html?em_pos=small&emc=edit_ty_20170214&nl=opinion-today&nl_art=1&nlid=34652724&ref=headline&te=1&_r=0

How Should One Resist the Trump Administration?

David Brooks

How should one resist the Trump administration? Well, that depends on what kind of threat Donald Trump represents.

It could be that the primary Trump threat is authoritarianism. It is hard to imagine America turning into full fascism, but it is possible to see it sliding into the sort of “repressive kleptocracy” that David Frum describes in the current Atlantic — like the regimes that now run Hungary, the Philippines, Venezuela and Poland.

In such a regime, democratic rights are slowly eroded. Government critics are harassed. Federal contracts go to politically connected autocrats. Congress, the media and the judiciary bend their knee to the vengeful strongman.

If that’s the threat, then Dietrich Bonhoeffer is the model for the resistance. Bonhoeffer was a Lutheran pastor who became an anti-Nazi dissident. Between 1933 and his capture in 1943, he condemned the Reich, protested the persecution of the Jews, organized underground seminaries and joined the German resistance. In the face of fascism, he wrote, it was not enough to simply “bandage the victims under the wheels of injustice, but jam a spoke into the wheel itself.”

If we are in a Bonhoeffer moment, then aggressive nonviolent action makes sense: marching in the streets, blocking traffic, disrupting town halls, vehement rhetoric to mobilize mass opposition.

Gerald Ford is one possible model for resisting the threat Donald Trump may create.George Tames/The New York Times

On the other hand, it could be that the primary threat is stagnation and corruption. In this scenario, the Trump administration doesn’t create an authoritarian regime, but national politics turns into a vicious muck of tweet and countertweet, scandal and pseudoscandal, partisan attack and counterattack.

If that’s the threat, St. Benedict is the model for resistance. Benedict was a young Umbrian man who was sent to study in Rome after the fall of the empire. Disgusted by the corruption all around, he fled to the wilderness and founded monastic communities across Europe. If Rome was going to sink into barbarism, then Benedictines could lead healthy lives and construct new forms of community far from the decaying center.

If we are in a Benedict moment, the smart thing to do is to ignore the degradation in Washington and make your contribution at the state and local levels.

Karlyn Bowman of the American Enterprise Institute notices that some of the interns in her think tank are thinking along Benedictine lines. In years past they were angling for career tracks that would land them in Washington, but now they are angling to go back to the places they came from.

The third possibility is that the primary threat in the Trump era is a combination of incompetence and anarchy. It could be that Trump is a chaotic clown incapable of conducting coherent policy. It could be that his staff members are a bunch of inexperienced second-raters.

Already the White House is back stabbing and dysfunctional. The National Security Council is in turmoil. Mussolini supposedly made the trains run on time, but this group couldn’t manage fascism in a phone booth.

It could be that Trumpism contains the seeds of its own destruction. The administration could be swallowed by some corruption scandal that destroys all credibility. Trump could flake out in the midst of some foreign policy crisis and the national security apparatus could have to flat out disobey him.

If the current reign of ineptitude continues, Republicans will eventually peel away. The Civil Service will begin to ignore the sloppy White House edicts. The national security apparatus will decide that to prevent a slide to global disorder, it has to run itself.

In this scenario, the crucial question is how to replace and repair. The model for the resistance is Gerald Ford, a decent, modest, experienced public servant who believed in the institutions of government, who restored faith in government, who had a plan to bind the nation’s wounds and restored normalcy and competence.

Personally, I don’t think we’re at a Bonhoeffer moment or a Benedict moment. I think we’re approaching a Ford moment. If the first three weeks are any guide, this administration will not sustain itself for a full term. We’ll need a Ford, or rather a generation of Fords to restore effective governance.

When this country was born, several of the founders wanted to feature Moses on the Great Seal of the United States. They didn’t want to do it because he liberated his people from tyranny. That was the easy part. They wanted to do it because he bound his people to law.

Now and after Trump, the great project is rebinding: rebinding the social fabric, rebinding the government to its people, and most of all, rebinding the heaping piles of wreckage that Trump will leave in his wake in Washington. Somebody will have to restore the party structures, rebuild Congress, revive a demoralized Civil Service.

These tasks aren’t magic. They are for experienced professionals. The baby boomer establishment polarized politics, lost touch with the voters and paved the way for Trump. We need a new establishment, one that works again.